POLL: What should our next Project be?

What should our next Project be?  Many of you know about Ginger (1967 45′ Connie) and The Professor (1962 44′ Roamer) … We have our next project in mind, but what do you think it should be? Enter your own options below!!

What should our next Project be? Many of you know about Ginger (1967 45' Connie) and The Professor (1965 44' Roamer)…

Posted by Life of a Captain – Antique and Classic Boat Foundation on Monday, December 2, 2019

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Get a Cruise on one of our classic vessels either in Chicago or Austin!

Want to join me in supporting a good cause? This #GivingTuesday I’m raising money for Life of a Captain – Antique and Classic Boat Foundation. Every little bit helps because on GivingTuesday Dec 3, Facebook will match donations.

  • $20 donation gets you a raffle ticket for a chance at a 1.5 hour cruise
  • $5,000 donation gets you two custom 2.5 hour cruises for up to 6 people, weekend use and overnight accommodations on the boat, Sunday brunch delivered to the boat, appetizers, cocktails and a docent tour.
  • $1,000 donation gets you a custom 2.5 hour cruise for 6 people with a docent tour and half hour pre-departure dock party that includes appetizers and cocktails..
  • $500 donation gets you a 1.5 hour cruise for 6 people.
  • $100 donation gets you 10 raffle tickets for a 1.5 hour cruise
  • $50 donation gets you one of our very first signature T-Shirts and two raffle tickets for a 1.5 hour cruise
  • $20 donation gets you a raffle ticket for a 1.5 hour cruise – at the end of the fundraiser we will randomly select one person from all the $20 donations as a winner of the cruise
    (cruises are either in Chicago or on Lake Travis, Austin Texas and do not include special events or holiday weekends.)

Donate Here —> https://www.facebook.com/donate/542032283246072/

I’ve included information about Life of a Captain – Antique and Classic Boat Foundation below. The Antique and Classic Boat Foundation is an association dedicated to connecting people who love and enjoy classic boats with events, information, expertise, and other people who share the passion. We provide information, education, and resources designed to promote, sustain and grow the hobby, professions, community, and lifestyle surrounding the safe enjoyment of classic boats and boating. We perpetuate the craftsmanship, artistry, and knowledge of the maritime traditions through education, public display, restoration and construction, and entertainment.

If you would like to join the event, I will send you a gentle reminder Tuesday Morning
https://www.facebook.com/events/420570008888486/

 

Want to join me in supporting a good cause? This #GivingTuesday I'm raising money for Life of a Captain – Antique and…

Posted by Life of a Captain – Antique and Classic Boat Foundation on Monday, December 2, 2019

 

 

 

 

 

Why there are locks and how they work

A lock is a device used for raising and lowering boatsships and other watercraft between stretches of water of different levels on river and canal waterways. The distinguishing feature of a lock is a fixed chamber in which the water level can be varied; whereas in a caisson lock, a boat lift, or on a canal inclined plane, it is the chamber itself (usually then called a caisson) that rises and falls.

Locks are used to make a river more easily navigable, or to allow a canal to cross land that is not level. Later canals used more and larger locks to allow a more direct route to be taken.

A lock is a part of a navigable waterway system that makes a water “channel” deep enough for vessels to use. The lock controls pool depths, for example in a lock and dam system across a waterway.

The lock is a place where boats that travel up or down a river or canal can be moved to the next higher or lower level. Locks are built in places where the level of the water in the river or canal suddenly changes. This may be because of a waterfall there, or because a dam or a weir has been built, or because some other thing is in the way. The lock is like a big chamber with gates at each end. They have lock gears which empty or fill the chamber with water. Locks help a river to be more easily navigable (easier for boats to travel up and down), or for canals to be built across country that is not level.

If a boat that is traveling downstream (in the same direction that the water is flowing) arrives at a lock, this is what happens:

  • The boat waits until the lock is full of water. If a boat going the other way has just come out of the lock, the water level will be right and the gates will be open. This will save time.
  • The entrance gates (if shut) are opened and the boat sails in.
  • The entrance gates are closed.
  • A valve is opened, and water flows out of the chamber so that the boat goes down.
  • When the water is at the level of the next bit of river, the exit gates are opened and the boat sails out.

If a boat that is traveling upstream (in the opposite direction to the water flow), the opposite happens:

  • The boat waits until the water level is low. If a boat going the other way has just come out of the lock, the water level will be right and the gates will be open.
  • The entrance gates (if shut) are opened and the boat sails in.
  • The entrance gates are closed.
  • A valve is opened, and water pours into the chamber so that the boat goes up.
  • When the water is at the level of the next bit of river, the exit gates are opened and the boat sails out.

The whole process of going through a lock may take about 15 to 20 minutes, depending on whether the boat has to wait. Some locks can take several boats at once, and the first one to enter may have to wait until other boats arrive.

File:UMRS Lock 12.jpg